AnalogSenses

By ÁLVARO SERRANO

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I Will Not Post This →

December 24, 2014 |

Dave Pell:

So don’t tweet. It’s not worth the risk. Don’t make phone calls. You’re being recorded. Don’t send emails. Sooner or later, we’ll all be reading them. Don’t take naked selfies, because some freak will find a way into your phone and share your photos in the seediest corners of the Internet. And the rest of us will have to look. Again, it’s not you. It’s us. On one hand, sorry for taking away your privacy, security and dignity. On the other hand, nice tits.

Privacy on the Internet is at an all-time low, and getting lower by the day. Companies like Google and Facebook get most of the bad press, but privacy is not invaded by companies, it’s invaded by people. It’s always been people. As long as there’s money to be made by airing someone else’s dirty secrets, this will not change.

If we want better privacy on the Internet, first we must become better people.

Via Ben Brooks.

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6 things The Oatmeal learned from riding in a Google self-driving car →

December 23, 2014 |

Matthew Inman:

When discussing self-driving cars, people tend to ask a lot of superficial questions: how much will these cars cost? Is this supposed to replace my car at home? Is this supposed to replace taxis or Uber? What if I need to use a drive-thru?

They ignore the smarter questions. They ignore the fact that 45% of disabled people in the US still work. They ignore the fact that 95% of a car’s lifetime is spent parked. They ignore how this technology could transform the lives of the elderly, or eradicate the need for parking lots or garages or gas stations. They dismiss the entire concept because they don’t think a computer could ever be as good at merging on the freeway as they are.

They ignore the great, big, beautiful picture staring them right in the face: that this technology could make our lives so much better.

There are still many kinks to iron out, but these cars already sound pretty damn impressive, and their potential is truly exciting.

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A Demon’s Voice reviews ‘The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies’ →

December 22, 2014 |

I love this guy’s reviews:

At this point in the Hobbit franchise, the Dwarves have made it to the mountain having woken the resident dragon up and told him to move his scaly arse. Their leader Thorin also appears to be going mad which could be due to the magical power of his gold or simply because he can’t find a great big shiny stone. If I can’t find my keys then I start smashing the shit out of the house in search of them, and so I think stomping around a mountain and threatening to banish all of your closest friends from your kingdom is more than reasonable behaviour.

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The Third Amsterdam Light Festival →

December 22, 2014 |

Amsterdam is a gorgeous city:

This winter, Amsterdam has lit up once again for the Amsterdam Light Festival. This is the third edition of the winter light festival which, for more than fifty days, illuminates the historical center of Amsterdam with projections on historical buildings, installations on the street,in public parks and on water for a unique experience in the darkest months of the year.

Via Coudal.

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Hovercraft to Paris →

December 22, 2014 |

Dave Wiskus and Jaimee Newberry’s new show is awesome:

So we decided to make it asynchronous and put it all on video. Inspired by John and Hank Green, we’re sending each other weekly video postcards via our new YouTube channel, called Hovercraft to Paris. This is an experiment, and all we have right now is the starting point: a conversation between friends. Like the best conversations between friends, it could go anywhere.

Sold.

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The Rise and Fall of Charm in American Men →

December 22, 2014 |

Benjamin Schwarz, The Atlantic:

This isn’t to attribute the dearth of charm to some cultural and social declension, although clearly charm—with its emotional, even aesthetic, detachment—could hardly have retained its social sway after that most overwrought of decades, the 1960s. Any culture that celebrates youth necessarily provides stony soil for charm, which is by definition a quality reserved for adults: the young can be charming, which is an inadvertent attribute; they cannot have charm.

Charm as a personal value — that is, a quality that can and should be cultivated, as opposed to an attribute one is born with — is increasingly rarer in today’s society and sadly, that’s not limited to American culture.

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