AnalogSenses

By ÁLVARO SERRANO

Tyson Robichaud reviews the Sony A7 Mark II →

March 30, 2015 |

Another interesting camera review for the day:

The way that I tend to shoot now has largely grown into being used to some of the new technological bells and whistles like focus peaking, live exposure display, tilting high res LCD screens and EVF’s that enable a variety of information to be overlaid through the finder. They have all have spoiled me to an extent. I’ve been able to compartmentalize my “full frame” system and my micro 4/3 mirrorless setup by separating their skill sets into “work camera” and “everyday camera” which has been easy enough. With the a7II, those lines are starting to blur.

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The radical humaneness of Norway’s Halden prison →

March 30, 2015 |

Jessica Benko, The New York Times:

Norway banned capital punishment for civilians in 1902, and life sentences were abolished in 1981. But Norwegian prisons operated much like their American counterparts until 1998. That was the year Norway’s Ministry of Justice reassessed the Correctional Service’s goals and methods, putting the explicit focus on rehabilitating prisoners through education, job training and therapy. A second wave of change in 2007 made a priority of reintegration, with a special emphasis on helping inmates find housing and work with a steady income before they are even released. Halden was the first prison built after this overhaul, and so rehabilitation became the underpinning of its design process. Every aspect of the facility was designed to ease psychological pressures, mitigate conflict and minimize interpersonal friction. Hence the blueberry forest.

Norway understands that the point of incarceration has to go beyond mere punishment. Rehabilitation is the true test of a nation’s prison system. Via Kottke.

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Jordan Steele reviews the Olympus OM-D E-M5 Mark II →

March 30, 2015 |

Jordan Steele:

The Olympus OM-D E-M5 Mark II is a very worthy successor to the original ground-breaking E-M5. Olympus has improved a great many things on the camera, including the direct controls, the viewfinder, the rear screen, the autofocus, the image stabilizer and more, while adding very interesting and useful new features such as Wi-Fi or the most-talked about feature, the High Resolution mode. This mode really does break new ground, allowing for 40 (JPEG) or 64 (RAW) Megapixel images for static scenes. It’s most definitely not a gimmick feature, and with a static scene and a solid tripod, will yield truly high-resolution images with good glass.

I really enjoy Jordan’s reviews, but they’re usually terrible for my wallet.

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MirrorLessons reviews the Leica T →

March 27, 2015 |

Interesting review by Mathieu Gasquet of MirrorLessons. It may look like he’s not overly enthusiastic about the camera, but that’s perhaps because of the huge expectations the Leica name invariably sets.

The new Leica T appears to be a very competent camera system, priced way over its current performance level. But then again, that’s what Leica has always been so I guess, in a way, it makes sense.

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The case against standing desks →

March 26, 2015 |

Rishabh R. Dassani:

Standing as a default behavior choice doesn’t work for a variety of reasons:

The first and the most important reason standing doesn’t work is because it isn’t productive. Standing and working at the same time affects overall performance because you’re focusing on two things. Having to distribute your cognitive capacities between standing and working nullifies the benefits you might get from standing alone because only part of your mental resources are going toward your work, thus making you less productive in the end.

I don’t know if I agree with that but until today, I had seen plenty of posts about how great standing desks are and not one post with an opposing view. It’s always good to hear both sides of an argument, particularly when scientific studies on the matter are not conclusive.

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Michael Fraser continues revisiting color film scanning →

March 26, 2015 |

Now we’re getting somewhere. I’m really liking how thorough and efficient the new workflow is. And he’s still not done:

All of this (including the points in Part 1) can be made into a Lightroom preset and Photoshop Action, with the only routine user intervention being the selection of a grey point in step 1 and pressing “Auto” in step 3. The (huge) benefit to this is that you can quickly preview the positive (but uncorrected) images before proceeding with the full conversion, which itself is only 2-3 clicks away.

My target, however, is to remove even this much intervention.

You have my undivided attention, sir.

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A briefcase containing the chronicles of an affair between a man and his secretary →

March 26, 2015 |

Messy Nessy Chic:

The briefcase was found three decades after the affair took place, abandoned in a German apartment and later sold at auction. The contents of the suitcase, an extraordinary collection of found materials that chronicled the adulterous relationship between a businessman and his secretary in the late 1960s and 70s, are now on display for all to see at an art gallery in New York.

Exposed to our own voyeurism, the exhibition invites us to discover an archive consisting of hundreds of photographs of the same woman, identified only as “Margret S,” posing in hotel rooms and enjoying secret getaways.

Next time somebody complains to you about how social networks and the Internet are destroying privacy and marriages, just point them towards this article.

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New York After Midnight →

March 26, 2015 |

New York Magazine has compiled a fantastic scrapbook of the city that never sleeps, at the time when everybody else is doing just that. It’s impossible to highlight just one passage from this stunning piece, so just take my word for it and go read the whole thing.

Via Kottke.

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