AnalogSenses

By ÁLVARO SERRANO

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Flickr apologizes and stops selling Creative Commons photos →

December 19, 2014 |

Bernardo Hernandez, Vice-President of Flickr:

We hear and understand your concerns, and we always want to ensure that we’re acting within the spirit with which the community has contributed. Given the varied reactions, as a first step, we’ve decided to remove the pool of Creative Commons-licensed images from Flickr Wall Art, effective immediately. We’ll also be refunding all sales of Creative Commons-licensed images made to date through this service.

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Jim Dalrymple’s Thoughts on iPad Sales →

December 19, 2014 |

Jim Dalrymple nails it:

People treat their iPad purchases like they treat their computer purchases. They expect these devices to last longer and do more than an iPhone. In a lot of ways, it’s a bizarre thought because of the similarities of the devices, but I believe this is what’s happening.

Simply put, the buying cycle for an iPad is a lot longer than it is for an iPhone.

That’s the real reason behind the slump in iPad sales. It’s got nothing to do with tablets being a fad or the iPad not being a desirable product anymore. iPads are still great, and anybody who owns one will tell you that much. In fact, iPads are so great that people keep them around for much longer than their iPhones, because they simply don’t feel the need to upgrade them every year.

The question is, once this knowledge sinks in at Apple, will the iPad refresh cycle get longer as well? On one hand, it’s awesome that iPads keep getting better at such great pace, with significant new features being added every year. On the other hand though, it’s hard to justify spending so many engineering resources on a product if there’s not enough demand to drive sustainable year-over-year growth. At this point, the only reason Apple has to keep their foot on the gas is to maintain the hardware lead they still enjoy over their competitors. That’s certainly no small thing, but is it enough for Apple to stay the course?

Is the iPad headed towards a more Mac-like future?

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“Goodbye, Nation. Goodbye, Blowhard Self”. →

December 18, 2014 |

The final episode of ‘The Colbert Report’ airs tonight:

For nine years, Stephen Colbert has relentlessly maintained his pompous, deeply ridiculous but consistently appealing conservative blowhard character on his late-night show, “The Colbert Report” — so much so that when he puts the character to rest for good on Thursday night, he may have to resort to comicide. The Grim Reaper is his last guest.

It’s sad to see such a great show end, but I’m really looking forward to see what Colbert — the real Colbert — does with ‘The Late Show’.

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The NYC subway in color pictures from 1966 →

December 18, 2014 |

Kelsey Campbell-Dollaghan, Gizmodo:

Change comes slowly to the subway. Signs hang for decades. Trains are rarely replaced. A new line can take centuries. So the subway captured in these remarkable images by photographer Danny Lyon in 1966 feels almost contemporary—which is what makes it shocking that they were shot 48 years ago.

I love these stories. Via Kottke.

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The year in media errors and corrections →

December 18, 2014 |

Some of these are hilarious. Kudos to The Economist, for example:

In a leader last month (Of bongs and bureaucrats, January 11th) we said that The Economist first proposed legalising drugs in 1993. In fact we argued for it in a cover story in 1988. Who says drug use doesn’t damage long-term memory?

Via Coudal.

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Yahoo’s Decline →

December 18, 2014 |

John Gruber:

Yahoo reportedly had an opportunity to buy Google in 2002 for $5 billion. Yahoo, under the leadership of CEO Terry Semel, declined. And that was the end of Yahoo. We all know hindsight is 20/20. There are all sorts of acquisitions that could have been made. But I would argue that acquiring Google in 2002 (if not earlier) was something Yahoo absolutely should have known they needed to do. The portal strategy had played itself out. All they were left with was their original purpose, serving as a starting page for finding what you were looking for on the web.

It’s unfortunate to see Yahoo struggling this bad. What really worries me though, is that Yahoo’s future also affects the rest of their properties, including Flickr. Marissa Mayer made a substantial effort to bring the service back to its glory days, but now it looks like she’s well on her way to getting canned as Yahoo’s CEO. Lately it seems Flickr has been doing much better, but will that be enough to survive her replacement?

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Bicycles in Language →

December 17, 2014 |

Mikael Colville-Andersen, worldwide bicycle ambassador and founder of Copenhagenize Design:

I have always been fascinated by how the bicycle has muscled its way into various languages. There are numerous bicycle references in Danish that are used by reflex, without any direct reference to a bicycle anecdote. I started wondering if this is the case in other languages and have scribbled notes down based on conversations with colleagues and friends.

This is awesome. Here’s to adding many more references to this list in the future.

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Tyson Robichaud reviews the Voigtlander Nokton 42.5mm f/0.95 lens for Micro Four Thirds →

December 17, 2014 |

This is an outstanding review, including two series of images that clearly show the behavior of the lens across the entire aperture range. I for one was surprised to see the subtle variations across different F-stops, as well as how good it is wide open. Every lens reviewer out there should do this.

It’s no secret that I’m a huge fan of the Voigtlander lenses for Micro Four Thirds. There are currently three — soon to be four — lenses in the lineup, and they’re all incredibly well-built and fast, with a maximum aperture of f/0.95. For those of you keeping score, that’s almost one full stop faster than its closest Micro Four Thirds competitor, the Panasonic Leica DG Nocticron 42.5mm f/1.2. This is how ridiculous that number is:

I love being able to save a stop or two in ISO value while out and about in the darker hours, and the focal length lends itself beautifully to candid, intimate shots, portraiture or street shooting. It’s heavy, but compared to an equivalent full frame optic, what am I saying, there are so few full frame optics even close to offering this set of skills that for those few that are out there, I’ll never even be able to dream of affording them. That, I believe, is the best thing that this lens offers. It’s built to last and gives micro 4/3 shooters an optical tool that most every photographer dreams about.

That’s exactly what’s so great about the Micro Four Thirds system. The 2x crop-factor of the sensor means that depth of field and high-ISO performance are roughly equivalent to a full-frame lens with double the focal length and F-stop number. For example, the Voigtlander 42.5mm f/0.95 would be roughly equivalent to an 85mm f/1.8 full-frame lens in terms of depth of field and high-ISO performance. However, speed — or rather, light-gathering ability — does not follow the same rule, and is the same regardless of the system. What this means is that the Voigtlander is actually a true f/0.95 lens in terms of speed, and it would be capable of capturing the exact same amount of light as a full-frame f/0.95 lens.

This extreme light-gathering ability would be priced in the multi-thousand-dollar range if it were a full-frame lens. For example, the legendary Leica Noctilux 50mm f/0.95 comes in at a whopping $10,745 on Amazon right now. By comparison, the $999 price tag of the Voigtlander looks rather quaint if you ask me. Robichaud seems to agree:

It’s not cheap, that is for sure. But this is not a cheaply made lens, and if you look at what it provides, there is no lens for any system, anywhere that can do what this lens does for near this same price at this same level of build and image quality that I’ve ever heard of. In that way, maybe it is kinda cheap.

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A Simple Guide To Buying Shit For People You Hate Buying For →

December 17, 2014 |

Ben Brooks offers some solid advice for late holiday shoppers:

We all have those people in our lives which seem impossible to buy for. I have a great many of them, so here’s some go to items (here’s hoping they don’t read this, ha) I am using this year.

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