AnalogSenses

By ÁLVARO SERRANO

The case against standing desks →

March 26, 2015 |

Rishabh R. Dassani:

Standing as a default behavior choice doesn’t work for a variety of reasons:

The first and the most important reason standing doesn’t work is because it isn’t productive. Standing and working at the same time affects overall performance because you’re focusing on two things. Having to distribute your cognitive capacities between standing and working nullifies the benefits you might get from standing alone because only part of your mental resources are going toward your work, thus making you less productive in the end.

I don’t know if I agree with that but until today, I had seen plenty of posts about how great standing desks are and not one post with an opposing view. It’s always good to hear both sides of an argument, particularly when scientific studies on the matter are not conclusive.

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Michael Fraser continues revisiting color film scanning →

March 26, 2015 |

Now we’re getting somewhere. I’m really liking how thorough and efficient the new workflow is. And he’s still not done:

All of this (including the points in Part 1) can be made into a Lightroom preset and Photoshop Action, with the only routine user intervention being the selection of a grey point in step 1 and pressing “Auto” in step 3. The (huge) benefit to this is that you can quickly preview the positive (but uncorrected) images before proceeding with the full conversion, which itself is only 2-3 clicks away.

My target, however, is to remove even this much intervention.

You have my undivided attention, sir.

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A briefcase containing the chronicles of an affair between a man and his secretary →

March 26, 2015 |

Messy Nessy Chic:

The briefcase was found three decades after the affair took place, abandoned in a German apartment and later sold at auction. The contents of the suitcase, an extraordinary collection of found materials that chronicled the adulterous relationship between a businessman and his secretary in the late 1960s and 70s, are now on display for all to see at an art gallery in New York.

Exposed to our own voyeurism, the exhibition invites us to discover an archive consisting of hundreds of photographs of the same woman, identified only as “Margret S,” posing in hotel rooms and enjoying secret getaways.

Next time somebody complains to you about how social networks and the Internet are destroying privacy and marriages, just point them towards this article.

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New York After Midnight →

March 26, 2015 |

New York Magazine has compiled a fantastic scrapbook of the city that never sleeps, at the time when everybody else is doing just that. It’s impossible to highlight just one passage from this stunning piece, so just take my word for it and go read the whole thing.

Via Kottke.

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MirrorLessons takes a look at the new Panasonic 42.5mm f/1.7 and 30mm f/2.8 Macro lenses for Micro Four Thirds →

March 25, 2015 |

These are two very interesting new lenses for the MFT system, particularly the 42.5mm lens, which will be a direct competitor to the amazing Olympus 45mm f/1.8 lens:

The 42.5mm has some interesting characteristics however. It has an all-metal finish which should prove more resistant than the plastic finish of the M.Zuiko 45mm. But what I like the most are its close focusing capabilities (30cm) which is closer than the Olympus version. The lens seems to deliver excellent image quality with great sharpness at f/1.7. Like the M.Zuiko version, this is another lens that really proves how great the MFT system can be: so small yet such excellent IQ. It also has optical stabilisation which naturally makes it a better choice for Lumix users. The autofocus was really fast with the Lumix GX7.

I own the Olympus lens and it’s easily one of the best deals in the the entire MFT system. I’m really curious to see how this new Panasonic lens stacks up against it.

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An awesome, animated Star Wars short →

March 25, 2015 |

Paul Johnson:

What if there was an Empire-focussed short Star Wars animation, drawn with the crazy detail and shading of classic 80s anime that’s all but vanished from Japan nowadays? Well, I tried my best.

Absolutely jaw-dropping.

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Craig Hockenberry on OLED displays →

March 25, 2015 |

Craig Hockenberry explains the differences between LCD and OLED displays. OLED is the display technology that is expected to make its debut in Apple’s product lineup with the Apple Watch:

One of my first impressions of the WATCH user interface was that it used a lot of black. This makes the face of the device feel more expansive because you can’t see the edges. But more importantly, those black pixels are saving power and extending the life of the display. It’s rare that engineering and design goals can align so perfectly.

And from what we’ve seen so far of the watch, that black is really really black. We’ve become accustomed to blacks on LCD displays that aren’t really dark: that’s because the crystals that are blocking light let a small amount pass through. Total darkness lets the edgeless illusion work.

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