AnalogSenses

By ÁLVARO SERRANO

Sepp Blatter to resign as FIFA President in wake of scandal →

June 02, 2015 |

Sam Borden, writing for The New York Times:

In a short speech delivered at the headquarters of FIFA, which oversees global soccer, Mr. Blatter said that “FIFA needs a profound restructuring” and that he had decided to step away from the organization where he had worked in various positions for 40 years. Mr. Blatter, 79, who spoke in French, then referred to his recent re-election by FIFA’s 209 member nations when he said, “Although the members of FIFA have given me the new mandate, this mandate does not seem to be supported by everybody in the world of football.”

No shit.

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The 20 Most Bike-Friendly Cities on the Planet →

June 02, 2015 |

It’s a great day for bicycle fans out there, as the 2015 edition of the Copenhagenize Index, which ranks the top-20 most bicycle-friendly cities in the world, was published today. Mikael Colville-Andersen, CEO of Copenhagenize Design Co., wrote a great feature for Wired analyzing the results and explaining how the ranking system works:

You can read about our full methodology here, but the key to a top spot is clear. You need serious advocacy, bike facilities, social acceptance, and a general perception that cycling is safe. You get extra points for a higher modal percentage—the share of residents who get around by bike as opposed to car or public transit—and for a 50-50 gender split among cyclists.

Of course, infrastructure is key. In Denmark and the Netherlands, a set of rules has evolved over a century. Tried and tested and proven to work, this established best practice is the model for cities everywhere. It includes making protected, one-way bike lanes that aren’t shared by cars, buses, or pedestrians. It means designing streets to limit the number and speed of cars in city centers, making public spaces safe and welcoming for everyone, not just drivers.

This year’s results have been interesting. Focusing on Spain we have Seville, which was ranked an impressive 4th last year but goes down to the 10th position this year, followed in 11th place by Barcelona. These are the only two Spanish cities among the top 20 this year. Clearly, we can — and totally should — do better.

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This week’s Tools & Toys review, by yours truly, touches on a topic near and dear to my heart: the bicycle. In many ways, this article is a love letter to the bicycle as much as it is a review of a bag:

On bicycles, humans become the most efficient animals in the world. Whether you’re going for your daily commute or for a week-long adventure surrounded by nature, the bicycle is a great means of transportation that lets you easily move from point A to point B while staying in touch with your environment. Feeling the spring wind in your face as you pedal your way to your destination is one of the greatest pleasures of riding a bike.

Don’t believe it? You need only watch a kid’s face whenever they ride. That invariable expression of pure, unadulterated joy is a tell-tale sign that the bicycle is something special.

English author H.G. Wells once said: “Every time I see an adult on a bicycle, I no longer despair for the future of the human race”. I couldn’t agree more.

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Matt Gemmell on designing websites to respect the reader →

June 01, 2015 |

Fantastic piece by Matt Gemmell:

I have a list of metrics that I automatically – even subconsciously – use when visiting a web site, to determine whether it’s worth my focus. Am I just a pair of eyeballs, or is this author really speaking to me? Have they given due thought to showing their work in the best light, or just thrown it up there? You can tell a lot about how a site’s author, or owning company, feels about you by how they balance the various tensions of design, content, monetisation, functionality, audience retention, and more.

I often look to Matt’s site for inspiration when I’m considering tweaks in the design for Analog Senses, because I very much share his commitment towards respecting the reader. This piece is an absolute must-read for anyone who writes for the Web.1


  1. Even if you don’t publish your words on your own website, all of the metrics in Matt’s article still apply: by publishing your work on a 3rd-party website or service that doesn’t respect its readers, you are implicitly endorsing that behavior and adopting it as your own.

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How exposure affects film →

June 01, 2015 |

Awesome article by the folks at Carmencita Film Lab:

What conclusions can be made from this test?

Well… first of all… 6 stops overexposed? And it still looks amazing? That’s pretty sweet. Overall, there seems to be a higher number of usable shots on the overexposure side than on the underexposure side. So what does this tell us? Film LOVES overexposure. Unlike what happens in digital photography, with overexposure film gets a little more saturated and you get more details on the shadows, but definitely no clipped highlights or “all-white” burnt images. That’s why it’s totally safe to say that if you’re in doubt between two possible camera values for your exposure you’ll always be safer on the “over” side than on the “under” one.

Like I’ve said multiple times here about shooting film: when in doubt, expose for the shadows and the highlights will take care of themselves.

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This Is What It’s Like To Fall In Love With A Woman Who Doesn’t Exist →

June 01, 2015 |

OK, this has got to be the creepiest story I’ve read in a long, long time:

Ruth Palmer, whose married name is Graves, is a 25-year-old account manager for a multinational firm. Originally from Brighton, she now lives in Dubai with her husband. She’s pretty, happy, and has a tight-knit group of friends. She has the sort of life many people would want for themselves. As it turns out, someone did.

Between the start of 2012 and January 2015, “Leah Palmer” stole more than 900 pictures from Ruth’s private Instagram account, and uploaded them as if they were her own. Leah had a Facebook page, several Twitter accounts, and even a Tinder account – all in Leah’s name, all using Ruth’s pictures. She would switch from one Twitter account to another without warning; the accounts would switch from public to private, apparently at random.

Ruth knew nothing until a university friend told her one night in January: “Have you seen this picture of you on Instagram? The picture belongs to you but this is a person called Leah.”

Online identity theft is very real and, in some cases, can go very far. This whole affair is a bit terrifying, to be honest.

Via The Newsprint.

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The Editing of MAD MAX: Fury Road →

June 01, 2015 |

Great piece by Vashi Nedomansky on the use of clever storytelling techniques to create Mad Max: Fury Road:

One of the many reasons MAD MAX: FURY ROAD is so successful as an action film is the editing style. By using “Eye Trace” and “Crosshair Framing” techniques during the shooting, the editor could keep the important visual information vital in one spot… the Center of the Frame. Because almost every shot was center framed, comprehending the action requires no hunting of each new shot for the point of interest. The viewer doesn’t need 3 or 4 frames to figure out where to look. It’s like watching an old hand-drawn flip book whiz by. The focus is always in the same spot!

I can’t tell you how much I hate movies that try to appear cool by editing action sequences by piecing together a million half-second vague, unclear shots. Unless they’re extremely well done, which is rare, those scenes tend to be a mess. All Bourne movies except for the very first one were ruined for me because of this, so I’m happy to see the new Mad Max movie is going in another direction.

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Salt Lake City Will Have First Protected Bike Intersection in the U.S. →

June 01, 2015 |

Jenn Stanley, writing for Next City:

Unlike other cities that currently have or are building protected bike lanes, this is the first time a city in the U.S. is building a fully protected intersection.

The city hopes that in addition to aiding cyclists, the new lane will increase local commerce. The area will also feature murals by local artists.

Sounds like a very smart move. Check this video detailing the intersection:

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Respect for your subjects in street photography →

May 29, 2015 |

Good advice by Julius Motal at The Phoblographer:

Belligerence towards an unwilling subject in street photography is at the very least unwarranted and deeply disrespectful. It signifies a disconnect, a lack of empathy, which ultimately affects the image and the photographer. Frustration is a very real and natural thing to feel, but when a photograph goes untaken, it’s gone. Nothing can really be done about it, and when someone signals that they want no part of it, it’s best to let it go.

Good photography is predicated on respect for your craft, for your peers, and most importantly for your subject. How you carry yourself and your camera on the street ultimately affects each image you try to make. If you’re aggressive with your camera, people will be inclined to defend themselves. Aggressiveness doesn’t necessarily mean exaggerated actions. It can be subtle. How you react to someone who objects will determine how the rest of the interaction goes.

I never feel anger towards my subjects, but I’m no stranger to feeling frustrated with myself. In my case, it’s often due to me hesitating a split second too long before pressing the shutter release. By the time I muster up the courage to take the picture, the moment is usually gone. The feeling of knowing you could have taken a great image but you were too indecisive to go for it is very real and can frustrate the hell out of many budding photographers. I suppose I’ll get better at judging these situations and going for more shots as I spend more and more time shooting in the streets but for now, when in doubt, I still prefer to err on the side of caution.

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Ben Brooks on Jony Ive’s retirement →

May 29, 2015 |

Another great piece by Ben. The Brooks family is on fire lately:

How is that not retirement?

If Ive is a driven man — meaning he is not content to sit on a beach everyday — and I have every reason to believe that he is certainly not that person, then is that not retirement to be able to design anything you want at the world’s biggest company?

Is it not retirement for him to step away from his duties, travel when, and for as long as, he wants, and still come back to design whatever he wants? If he so feels the need, or urge, to make a phone he still can. If he wants to make that chair, or mug, he now can.

It hadn’t occurred to me to look at the announcement this way, but it makes perfect sense. Ive is dictating his own terms now, and it will be incredibly interesting to see where this newfound freedom takes him.

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