AnalogSenses

By ÁLVARO SERRANO

"Hard Times" by Andy Ihnatko →

March 21, 2011 |

Andy Ihnatko’s next Big Hit, completely recorded and edited using GarageBand on an iPad 2.

Impressive. So much for the iPad being only a consumption device. And Ihnatko can sing. Also, don’t forget to read through his excellent, epic review of the iPad 2 for the Chicago Sun-Times. It even ends with a Conan The Barbarian reference.

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Bluetooth tether iPad to iPhone in iOS 4.3 without jailbreak →

March 21, 2011 |

Came across this undocumented feature of the new iOS 4.3 update for iPad and iPhones and seems that now you can use the new Personal Hotspot feature in iOS 4.3 for iPhone 4 [Update: turns out it works with iPhone 3G and iPhone 3GS on iOS versions less than 4.3] to tether the iPad to the iPhone via Bluetooth for Internet connectivity.

There goes the last remaining rational reason for me to go with the 3G iPad 2. If you live in a place where WiFi is reasonably ubiquitous and have a smartphone with a nice data plan, it makes little sense to fork over the $130 AND another data plan in order to get 3G connectivity for those rare occasions when you may need it. The only possible scenario that I can come up with is if your smartphone’s battery is dead. The WiFi hotspot can drain the battery pretty quickly, but the Bluetooth tether should go a lot more easy on it.

I can se why Apple would not tout this new feature, and decided to implement it as silently as possible instead. It probably wouldn’t significantly hurt the sales of the 3G iPad, but why take the chance?

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AnandTech thoroughly reviews the iPad 2 →

March 21, 2011 |

As I mentioned in our review of the first iPad last year, this is a device that augments your existing setup - it replaces nothing. You’ll still need a computer of some sort and you’ll still need a phone, you just get to have another device that’s more convenient than both of those occasionally.

Anand once again nails it. This is exactly the point of the iPad: it’s better (read: more convenient) than a laptop or a smartphone at certain things that people actually do every day. For many people this is a legitimate reason to buy one, and it’s easy to see why. Now, could it replace any of those other devices? I honestly don’t think so, at least not yet, and that’s the reason I didn’t buy the first generation iPad.

However, it is quickly becoming so much more convenient at those tasks that I can easily see it as the first go-to device for many, many people in the not-so-distant future. And it’s only going to get better. In my case, the platform is mature enough that I can finally wander into it with confidence.

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AT&T swallows T-Mobile to create US' largest carrier →

March 20, 2011 |

Ars Techica:

Today, AT&T announced a $39 billion deal with T-Mobile’s parent company, Deutsche Telekom, that will see T-Mobile’s customers and infrastructure become part of AT&T, creating the US’ largest cellular carrier, and the only one to offer GSM phones.

I wonder where that came from. Now it’s probably a good time to watch this again…

Or this.

Or this.

Or this.

Or this.

Or even this.

For the life of me, I did NOT see this coming.

UPDATE: Maybe I’m imagining things, but the AT&T guy kind of reminds me of someone.

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Fragility of Free →

March 17, 2011 |

Ben Brooks:

The fragility of free is a catchy term that describes what happens when the free money runs out. Or — perhaps more accurately — when the investors/founders/venture capitalists run out of cash, or patience, or both. Because at some point Twitter and all other companies have to make the move from ‘charity’ to ‘business’ — or, put another way, they have to make the move from spending tons of money to making slightly more money than they spend.

Great piece on why it is always worth paying for the applications and services that you use every day. I am currently working on a long-form piece on this very same topic, but from a different angle.

I also like to pay for the software and services that I use, but honestly I had never thought about it in terms of protecting their long-term existence. To me it was always about supporting the hard work of the developers and the countless hours they put into making the apps. I have huge respect for their work because I know how difficult it is to make a truly great app.

Via shawnblanc.net.

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Quote of the Day →

March 17, 2011 |

In journalism, there has always been a tension between getting it first and getting it right.

Ellen Goodman (1941 - )

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TSA says radiation of body scanners 10 times higher than expected →

March 16, 2011 |

Ars Technica:

The Transportation Security Administration is reanalyzing the radiation levels of X-ray body scanners installed in airports nationwide, after testing produced dramatically higher-than-expected results.

They say that the difference in the radiation levels is due to a calculation error, but that the scanners are still safe and will remain in operation, for now.

From an engineering standpoint, I have to agree the radiation levels involved seem to be safe with a comfortable margin (1,000 scans are equivalent to one standard chest X-ray). But still, that is not the issue here. The issue is that the TSA has deployed an insufficiently researched technology, without any kind of medical studies backing it up. This so-called “calculation error” could have been much higher, and we only would have found out now, many months after they started operating.

From a personal standpoint, though, I don’t like those scanners one bit.

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TechCrunch clarifies AOL censorship incident, blames Moviefone instead →

March 16, 2011 |

Great article by Paul Carr on how AOL didn’t actually ask TechCrunch to “tone down” their post about the marketing strategy behind the movie Source Code:

Apparently someone at Summit didn’t like the “snark” in Alexia’s post. They passed on their concerns to their Moviefone contact in the hope that, as an AOL sister site, Moviefone would be able to lean on Alexia to tone it down. Sure enough, someone at Moviefone emailed Alexia…

All in all, a great read. Paul’s honest-to-god assessment of the situation and criticism of AOL are praise-worthy:

Actually, Patricia, you only have two loyalties: one is to your readers and one is to the company that signs your paychecks. That’s it. You do not – emphatically _do not_ – have a responsibility to “stay on good terms” with movie studios. On the contrary, when a movie company asks you to try to strong-arm a college into dialing down her editorial voice, it’s in your best interests as a professional editor to tell them to go fuck themselves.
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