AnalogSenses

By ÁLVARO SERRANO

When Will Microsoft’s Internet Bloodbath End? →

April 30, 2011 |

What they don’t bother to mention in the release, but they can’t hide in the actual numbers, is just how bad the quarter actually was for the division. While revenue may have grown a bit year over year, income — as in the money you actually get to keep — was an entirely different story. It was a bloodbath, really. Yes, again > >

Worth it for the chart alone. AND Patrick Bateman’s picture, of course.

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Sony to PSN users: your credit card info may be safe after all →

April 28, 2011 |

Sony says that, though credit card info may not have been compromised, caution is still your best friend:

Q: Was my credit card data taken? A: While all credit card information stored in our systems is encrypted and there is no evidence at this time that credit card data was taken, we cannot rule out the possibility. If you have provided your credit card data through PlayStation Network or Qriocity, out of an abundance of caution we are advising you that your credit card number (excluding security code) and expiration date may have been obtained. Keep in mind, however that your credit card security code (sometimes called a CVC or CSC number) has not been obtained because we never requested it from anyone who has joined the PlayStation Network or Qriocity, and is therefore not stored anywhere in our system.

The company was heavily criticized for their lack of transparency following last week’s incident, when they were forced to shut down their PlayStation Network service, revealing it had been hacked and personal data from their users had been compromised.

Though the situation remains very serious, this new update will help clean their image a bit. As we’ve recently seen with Apple, the sooner you tackle these problems, the better. Whenever something this bad happens, people want to know exactly what went wrong, how bad it really was and more importantly, how they’re going to clean up the mess. Every day that you stay silent and obscure about what happened damages your reputation even further.

Sony seems to have learned its lesson the hard way, let’s hope they can fix the issue as soon as possible.

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Apple Q&A on Location Data →

April 28, 2011 |

6. People have identified up to a year’s worth of location data being stored on the iPhone. Why does my iPhone need so much data in order to assist it in finding my location today? This data is not the iPhone’s location data—it is a subset (cache) of the crowd-sourced Wi-Fi hotspot and cell tower database which is downloaded from Apple into the iPhone to assist the iPhone in rapidly and accurately calculating location. The reason the iPhone stores so much data is a bug we uncovered and plan to fix shortly (see Software Update section below). We don’t think the iPhone needs to store more than seven days of this data.

Interesting response from Apple PR regarding the location-tracking file that was discovered on iPhones last week. It doesn’t avoid responsibility, and states clearly what has happened and what they plan to do about it.

I agree with Christina Warren that it took them a bit too long to come out with this, but as they say, better late than never.

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Your iPhone Knows What You Did Last Summer →

April 21, 2011 |

So your iPhone—and probably your computer—now both have a file that mirrors data that was previously limited to law enforcement, which itself was only able to obtain it from a court order. Without encrypted backups, someone who has access to your computer can see your whereabouts. “By passively logging your location without your permission, Apple have made it possible for anyone from a jealous spouse to a private investigator to get a detailed picture of your movements”.

This is scary. We still don’t know why that file even exists, but  it must surely have a purpose that Apple so far hasn’t disclosed. Whatever it is though, there is no excuse for just leaving the file there unprotected. The bare minimum precaution that they should have taken is encrypting the file. There are many disturbed people out there.

Of course, every time something like this happens, a Senator starts sending open letters and asking philosophical questions in the name of every Red, White and Blue American.

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Quote of the Day →

April 19, 2011 |

If the world should blow itself up, the last audible voice would be that of an expert saying it can’t be done

Peter Ustinov (1921 - 2004), English actor & author .


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Quote of the Day →

April 17, 2011 |

There is an evil tendency underlying all our technology - the tendency to do what is reasonable even when it isn’t any good

Robert Pirsig, Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance.

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Adobe Throws in Towel →

April 17, 2011 |

Ars Technica:

Instead of getting Steve Jobs to relent on his “thoughts on Flash”, however, Adobe is adding HTTP Live Streaming support to Flash Media Server.

I was surprised to read this at first, but it’s only logical. Adobe has painted itself into a corner with Flash on mobile devices. You know, that wonderful plugin that plays every kind of video on the Web and runs rich applications without burning through battery life? The one that is always mysteriously two-weeks away from being, you know, real? It’s coming back to bite them.

Adobe’s gamble was that consumers would rise up against Apple’s tyranny and demand Flash support on iOS devices, or else they would abandon Apple’s platform in droves. What they didn’t understand then is that playing video on the Web has never been an actual problem for iOS users for years. Nearly all of the video on the Web is available for Flash, yes; but under the hood, most of those videos are actually coded in H.264, which iOS devices can play just fine. In order to get to every user, many content providers are choosing to enable fallbacks to serve non-Flash users the original H.264 video directly through HTML5’s video element.

With each additional million iOS devices sold by Apple, Adobe’s stance weakens progressively. Every Android tablet that comes out sporting a half-baked version of Flash hurts their case and damages their image even more. And so, we have now come to a situation in which content providers cannot afford to ignore the iOS platform any more (content providers that want to make money, that is). They were waiting for Flash to solve their needs, but it was only a matter of time they started looking elsewhere. Adobe’s decision was not altruistic, it was a pure survival move.

It is ironic that, while Adobe’s public message and justification for Flash were ostensibly focused on defending the users’ rights and freedom, its actions seem to be focused on catering to the needs of content providers instead (which, coincidentally, are the ones that pay Adobe to use Flash).

I’m not saying that Flash is dead. Far from it. But I am saying that the days of Flash being the only way to play video on the Web are over. Flash will still be around and its relevance in the traditional PC space is huge, but if it wants to be a player in the mobile landscape, it needs to evolve.

This announcement marks Adobe’s first step on a new path. Only time will tell if it is the right one.

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Self-Remembering →

April 17, 2011 |

From my experiencing self, for my remembering self. I embark on my second year of travel. My name is Emily Caldwell. Nice to meet you.

Beautiful and Inspiring.

Nice to meet you, Emily.

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