AnalogSenses

By ÁLVARO SERRANO

Your iPhone Knows What You Did Last Summer →

April 21, 2011 |

So your iPhone—and probably your computer—now both have a file that mirrors data that was previously limited to law enforcement, which itself was only able to obtain it from a court order. Without encrypted backups, someone who has access to your computer can see your whereabouts. “By passively logging your location without your permission, Apple have made it possible for anyone from a jealous spouse to a private investigator to get a detailed picture of your movements”.

This is scary. We still don’t know why that file even exists, but  it must surely have a purpose that Apple so far hasn’t disclosed. Whatever it is though, there is no excuse for just leaving the file there unprotected. The bare minimum precaution that they should have taken is encrypting the file. There are many disturbed people out there.

Of course, every time something like this happens, a Senator starts sending open letters and asking philosophical questions in the name of every Red, White and Blue American.

♤ ♧ ♡ ♢

Quote of the Day →

April 19, 2011 |

If the world should blow itself up, the last audible voice would be that of an expert saying it can’t be done

Peter Ustinov (1921 - 2004), English actor & author .


♤ ♧ ♡ ♢
♤ ♧ ♡ ♢

Quote of the Day →

April 17, 2011 |

There is an evil tendency underlying all our technology - the tendency to do what is reasonable even when it isn’t any good

Robert Pirsig, Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance.

♤ ♧ ♡ ♢

Adobe Throws in Towel →

April 17, 2011 |

Ars Technica:

Instead of getting Steve Jobs to relent on his “thoughts on Flash”, however, Adobe is adding HTTP Live Streaming support to Flash Media Server.

I was surprised to read this at first, but it’s only logical. Adobe has painted itself into a corner with Flash on mobile devices. You know, that wonderful plugin that plays every kind of video on the Web and runs rich applications without burning through battery life? The one that is always mysteriously two-weeks away from being, you know, real? It’s coming back to bite them.

Adobe’s gamble was that consumers would rise up against Apple’s tyranny and demand Flash support on iOS devices, or else they would abandon Apple’s platform in droves. What they didn’t understand then is that playing video on the Web has never been an actual problem for iOS users for years. Nearly all of the video on the Web is available for Flash, yes; but under the hood, most of those videos are actually coded in H.264, which iOS devices can play just fine. In order to get to every user, many content providers are choosing to enable fallbacks to serve non-Flash users the original H.264 video directly through HTML5’s video element.

With each additional million iOS devices sold by Apple, Adobe’s stance weakens progressively. Every Android tablet that comes out sporting a half-baked version of Flash hurts their case and damages their image even more. And so, we have now come to a situation in which content providers cannot afford to ignore the iOS platform any more (content providers that want to make money, that is). They were waiting for Flash to solve their needs, but it was only a matter of time they started looking elsewhere. Adobe’s decision was not altruistic, it was a pure survival move.

It is ironic that, while Adobe’s public message and justification for Flash were ostensibly focused on defending the users’ rights and freedom, its actions seem to be focused on catering to the needs of content providers instead (which, coincidentally, are the ones that pay Adobe to use Flash).

I’m not saying that Flash is dead. Far from it. But I am saying that the days of Flash being the only way to play video on the Web are over. Flash will still be around and its relevance in the traditional PC space is huge, but if it wants to be a player in the mobile landscape, it needs to evolve.

This announcement marks Adobe’s first step on a new path. Only time will tell if it is the right one.

♤ ♧ ♡ ♢

Self-Remembering →

April 17, 2011 |

From my experiencing self, for my remembering self. I embark on my second year of travel. My name is Emily Caldwell. Nice to meet you.

Beautiful and Inspiring.

Nice to meet you, Emily.

♤ ♧ ♡ ♢
♤ ♧ ♡ ♢

The Future is Now! →

April 15, 2011 |

Minimal Mac:

Then, a few minutes later he stated his desire to sign up and asked when we could set up a time. “You have your laptop sitting there so how about right now?”, I asked.

This is so full of WIN. It is a fantastic example of how technology can help us in our everyday tasks. That’s what Analog Senses is all about: technology should be at our service, and it should always be as invisible and non-intrusive as possible.

♤ ♧ ♡ ♢

Marco Arment rounds up the first official BlackBerry PlayBook reviews →

April 15, 2011 |

The latest challenger to the “iPad killer” title is finally here. How does it stack up against the ruthless scrutiny of our favorite tech writers? Well, let’s find out:

They all agree on the major points: very good hardware overall, awful power button, good battery life, rushed and unfinished software, horrible third-party apps, inexplicable requirement of having a BlackBerry smartphone to use email and calendar, but lots of promise for future improvements.

That’s it in a nut. It looks like a very promising device, but they still didn’t come up with a compelling answer to the million-dollar question: “Why would I buy one of these instead of an iPad?”

My guess is, if you already have a BlackBerry smartphone, then it kind of makes sense. Sort of. For everybody else though, not so much. Not yet.

♤ ♧ ♡ ♢
♤ ♧ ♡ ♢